Emotional Abuse in Children Linked to Later Migraine

Childhood emotional abuse may lead to migraines in young adults, according to a study that was presented this month at the American Academy of Neurology’s Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada.

Researchers found that the link between migraine and abuse was stronger for emotional abuse than for physical or sexual abuse. The study included 14,500 people between the ages of 24 to 32 from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Continue Reading



Tension-Type Headache Related to Neck Strength

Individuals who suffer from tension-type headaches may wish to turn to strength training for relief.

A recent Danish study has revealed that compared to a control group, patients who experience tension-type headache have decreased neck strength and also have less shoulder strength. Researchers say that when neck extensor muscles are weak, the flexor muscles over compensate and may pull the head forward, contributing to headache. Continue Reading


Temperature Sensitivity May Mean More Migraines in Winter

Winter

Patients who experience migraine and tension-type headache frequently report weather as a trigger, although research to support those claims has been mixed. Now, researchers from Taiwan say many of those individuals are right in their perceptions. A recent study has found that individuals who believe they are sensitive to weather experienced an increase in their headaches during the winter, particularly with mild headaches. Continue Reading


Triple-Combination Medication Is Best Bet for Tension Headache Relief

A recent study indicates that aspirin taken with acetaminophen and caffeine is more effective than aspirin alone.

Tension headaches are the most common form of headaches and affect more than 20% of the population. Frequently, tension headache sufferers turn to over-the-counter medications for relief.

A recent study indicates that medication containing a combination of acetylsalicylic acid, (aspirin), acetaminophen, and caffeine is more effective than acetaminophen alone. Continue Reading